Amplify Word-of-Mouth Impact in the New Wave

Amplify Word-of-Mouth Impact in the New Wave
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
The New Wave—the young, diverse segment of Americans aged 18 to 39—value word-of-mouth and engage it more than older Americans. In this study, we share two steps and five tactics that brands should leverage to drive word-of-mouth in this segment. Download a sample of the study below.
 

Don’t Miss the Next Webinar 

February 27th | 2PM

As part of our 2019 Roundtable research, we took a deep dive to understand what drives word-of-mouth influence in the New Wave, the young, diverse segment of Americans aged 18 to 39. We found that New Wavers are much more likely to rely on word-of-mouth when seeking out new products than their older counterparts. And it’s become an expectation and necessary step on the path-to-purchase for many of these young, diverse consumers.

The New Wave is also more likely to engage in word-of-mouth—both online and offline! This is good news for brands—it means you don’t have to work as hard to get these people sharing. The challenge, of course, is making sure that when they share it’s about your brand, and that sentiment is positive.

Our 2019 Roundtable research provides two steps to keep you top-of-mind and at the center of discussion.

  1. The first step is to quantify influence so you can identify the most influential segments in the new wave. We employ two methods to help you quantify influence and identify segments to target. The first uses factor analysis to identify the segments most likely to exhibit attitudes and behaviors related to word-of-mouth.  The second uses an ego-based social network analysis to understand how far influence is likely to spread given the makeup of each segment’s social networks.

  2. The second step is to activate the New wave to share. We provide two tactics to help you amplify word of mouth in the most influential New Wave segments and three tactics to drive word-of-mouth across all New Wavers.

Download the attached PowerPoint deck for insights and executional examples to help you harness the influence power of the New Wave.

If you are interested in joining peer-to-peer calls with non-competitive members to share insights and discuss strategies to manage this issue, exploring custom qualitative or quantitative research for your brand or category, or having an initial conversation with our consulting team about methods to deal with this topic, please fill out the form below. 

Latest Content

Amplify Word-of-Mouth Impact in the New Wave

The New Wave—the young, diverse segment of Americans aged 18 to 39—value word-of-mouth and engage it more than older Americans. In this study, we share two steps and five tactics that brands should leverage to drive word-of-mouth in this segment.

Mom Knows Best: Understanding the Key Decision-Makers of the Family, with Special Attention to Hispanic Moms

Mom Knows Best: Understanding the Key Decision-Makers of the Family, with Special Attention to Hispanic Moms
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Moms are essential to running their families, as well as driving brand growth. Dive into our research for strategic insights on how you can capture spending from moms across segments, as well as specifically resonate with Hispanic moms.

We all know moms play an important role in the family, but they’re also a crucial consumer group! They overwhelmingly steer their family’s purchases as they research products, do the shopping, and make countless decisions when it comes to budgeting and spending. However, many moms feel misunderstood by the very brands and companies they’re pouring themselves into as consumers. This means that moms merit specific attention.

It’s also important to recognize that not all moms are alike. After all, racial and ethnic background often shape the way mothers raise children and navigate the challenges of motherhood. Hispanic moms are an especially important group to focus on given the Hispanic segment’s current and projected population and spending growth. Brands that capture Hispanic moms today not only win the moms—they’re also taking steps to capture their children’s attention down the road.

To help you better understand who moms are and how they act as consumers, we’ve compiled data from 2019 Collage Group syndicated research initiatives. We’ve broken the data down by moms vs. non-moms, and further by Hispanicity.

We start off by providing Cultural Attribute Profiles for each group. These profiles reveal how each group scores on important characteristics including: anxiety, cultural rootedness, exceptionalism, independence, adventurousness, and compliance. Then, we cover relationships and family dynamics. Afterwards, we take a deep dive on moms’ path to purchase, including social media influence, product reviews, word-of-mouth, and shopping behaviors. Lastly, our study concludes with a section on what holidays and nightlife are like for moms.

Our insights will help you execute campaigns that will win across the board with moms, and also ways that you can take a targeted approach to resonate with Hispanic moms.

Strategic takeaways from our research include:

  1. Moms are heavy social media users. They use it as a tool to gather product information, as well as to share their own experiences. Brands should have a strong social media presence and make product information accessible. This is also an opportunity to tap into the power of mom influencers to bolster brand awareness.
  2. Preserving culture is a point of concern for Hispanic Moms. They want to ensure their children appreciate their roots. Tap into cultural identity and family themes simultaneously. This intersection is where heritage is top-of-mind for Hispanic Moms.
  3. Moms are the primary drivers of planning, organizing, and spending for special occasions. They love celebrating holidays and making them special for their kids. Holiday activations should be targeted at moms. Highlight your product’s ability to support their holiday celebrations.

Amplify Word-of-Mouth Impact in the New Wave

The New Wave—the young, diverse segment of Americans aged 18 to 39—value word-of-mouth and engage it more than older Americans. In this study, we share two steps and five tactics that brands should leverage to drive word-of-mouth in this segment.

Superbowl LIV Halftime Proves Brands Can Use Hispanic Culture to Win the General Market

Superbowl LIV Halftime Proves Brands Can Use Hispanic Culture to Win the General Market
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Our post-Superbowl survey on the halftime show found that Hispanic, Black, and White consumers in the “New Wave” (ages 18-39) are receptive to Hispanic culture and messaging. This data further supports our claim that brands can win across this segment with a multicultural message.

Don’t Miss the Next Webinar

Gen Z & Millennial Essential Traits

February 19th | 2PM

“I don’t know what [NFL commissioner] Goodell was thinking,” confided a colleague after reflecting on the Superbowl LIV halftime extravaganza featuring Jennifer Lopez and Shakira. “Frankly, I’m shocked he signed off on that thing.”

Google “super bowl halftime controversy 2020” and you’ll get over six million results.  It seems a lot of people shared my friend’s view that Roger Goodell’s decision to feature the Latina superstars was suspect. But many more would likely champion the decision based on the massive positive press around JLo’s celebration of Puerto Rico, Shakira’s nod to her middle eastern heritage, and of course the spike in both artists’ record sales and online streams.

But anecdotal evidence only provides limited insight. To really understand what consumers thought about this culturally charged event, brands need data. So, we fielded a survey to 284 Hispanic, Black, and White consumers age 18-39.  We call this segment the “New Wave,” defined by an experience of growing up in an intrinsically diverse America. The findings from this survey and what they mean for brands are below.

First, and most importantly, the New Wave was exceptionally positive about the halftime show. In fact, almost 80% or more of each segment said they enjoyed the show.

When asked what they liked most, respondents repeatedly mentioned Latinas and Latin culture, as you see in the quotes below.  If Goodell’s intent was to ensure the NFL’s relevance to the 25 million Hispanic NFL fans who are part of America’s fastest growing demographic, then his decision to celebrate Hispanic culture and its growing influence on America was a no-brainer.

Second, almost 70% of women surveyed thought the halftime show empowered women. 23% of White women felt the show objectified women, while less than half that percentage of Hispanic and Black women felt the same. One caveat: Unacculturated Hispanics were slightly more likely (21%) to think the show objectified women.

Third, over 80% of Hispanics thought the show represented Hispanic culture well. And 60% of these individuals also agreed that it represented American culture well. What’s really interesting is that non-Hispanic segments were even more likely to hold this view. Over 80% of the Black respondents and 62% of the White respondents who thought the show represented Hispanic culture well also thought the show represented American culture well. These data reveal that a majority of people can view something as both strongly Hispanic and strongly American – these are not trade-offs.  And you don’t even have to be Hispanic to hold that view.

Our data indicate that the vast majority of the New Wave—18-39 year old Americans—did not find the show particularly controversial and were thrilled about the inclusion of superstar Latinas. This finding is further evidence that brands looking to take the next big step in marketing, which is to lead with multicultural, will be well-positioned to win with the New Wave. Your brand should follow the evidence and lean into the multicultural space to ensure you capture your share of this segment’s attention and loyalty.

Diverse Representation in Ads Is Not Enough to Win The “New Wave” of Diverse, Young Americans

Diverse Representation in Ads Is Not Enough to Win The “New Wave” of Diverse, Young Americans
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Across 2019, we analyzed almost 150 ads, gathering almost 100,000 surveys and 20 million datapoints. Using this data, we developed the Cultural Fluency Quotient, a new metric to predict brand favorability and purchase intent, and ran machine learning on the data to derive powerful new insights into what matters for every demographic.  Read on for critical insights into the creative strategy you need to win the New Wave.

Access the Presentation 

Keys to Culturally Fluent Creative for the New Wave

In a climate of increasing tribalism exacerbated by social media polarization, advertisers must appeal to the most complex mix of demographics in American history while steering clear of unintended backlash.  Every quarter has its walk of shame for one or more brands, most recently Peloton for its widely reviled holiday commercial “The Gift that Gives Back” that tanked the stock by over 10% in early December 2019.

As many members know, we have been building a capability we call AdRate leveraging a database of consumer response to ads. Across the last 18 months, we have been conducting research based on a new way of looking at brand favorability called Groundswell and Backlash, and applied machine learning to reveal powerful insights into how people from different cultural backgrounds process ads.

As the database grows, our ability to derive deeper insights and develop more predictive metrics increases.  For this study we developed the Cultural Fluency Quotient (CFQ), a weighted combination of three factors that best predict post-view brand favorability and purchase intent, which is then indexed for each demographic.  We ranked ads on CFQ for each demographic and ran machine learning on the top and bottom performing ads to derive the factors that best predict both high Cultural Fluency and what to avoid.

One key insight here is to go beyond performance norms.  We therefore also look at how important a norm is to high CFQ.  After all, it makes no sense to focus overly on how well an ad’s visuals perform (for example), if visuals are not a driver of cultural fluency.  For this reason, we use our machine learning results to derive importance scores an dozens of attributes of ads.  We then plot the results on a 2×2, as shown below.  The winning ads do well (horizontal axis) on what matters (vertical axis).

When we run the numbers, the findings are similar for every demographic. The best ads tell a simple story using ONE multicultural perspective, with attention to authentic texture.  These ads avoid the trap of representing every demographic at once, and ensure the viewer is not confused by the relationship between the product and the story.

The top two insights from this analysis imply:

  • It’s Not Just Casting: Creating common ground is not just “representation.”  You see that in the chart below that People & Characters are not as important as Story and Message. Diverse representation is necessary but it’s only price of entry.

  • The Story is Everything: Storytelling is by far the most impactful way to build cultural relevance. No story, no cultural fluency.
  •  

Few ads better exemplify this point than US Banks “Hard Work Works: Flying Home.”

The Cultural Fluency Imperative: How to Win the “New Wave” of Diverse, Young Consumers

The Cultural Fluency Imperative: How to Win the “New Wave” of Diverse, Young Consumers
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

The 2019 Roundtable Series inaugurated a new chapter in the way we help organizations activate young diverse consumers. Learn about our Cultural Fluency Framework and how applying our three-part approach can help connect your brand equities more reliably to the Group Traits of these consumers.

Don’t Miss the Next Webinar

Key Insights into Multicultural Moms

February 12th | 2PM

How should marketers reach younger and more diverse Americans, the generation between 18 and 39 whose spending is set to explode?  To answer this question, we enhanced the Cultural Fluency framework we first introduced in 2017, to better increase the ROI on marketing to a diverse America.

Listen to or download this presentation to learn about:

  1. Our three-part framework for deepening Cultural Fluency for the New Wave.
  2. Details of the New Wave Group Traits, covering the “what, how and where” of marketing to this segment.
  3. Case study examples outlining how a handful of leading brands are activating against these Traits.

Webinar Replay
How to Win America’s New Wave of Multicultural Consumers

The Cultural Fluency Imperative

Indeed, applying a demographic lens alone is not only superficial and impractical, but also ignores the commonalities that bind people together across different cultural experiences.

For that reason, we have developed an exhaustive analytical method for understanding how cultures vary, identifying six cultural attributes that can be used to culturally profile any segment.  This work has formed the foundation of our Essentials of Multicultural and Generational Marketing work.

And for younger Americans in particular, this approach is especially important.  This group has grown up in an environment of intrinsic diversity not experienced by older generations, and which unites their consumption behavior across demographic labels. We call this group the “New Wave” of consumers, those consumers born into an America that was already intrinsically diverse.

According to our research, New Wavers possess six Group Traits as shown in the graphic below.

Understanding “What to Say”

Marketers can use this framework to first understand the core cultural attributes underlying how culture is expressed in the Group Traits of any particular segment.  In this presentation we apply the model to the New Wave.  Please review our Essentials work to see how the model is applied to Multicultural and Generational Segments, or contact your Client Services representative to learn more about applying the framework to your subcategory.

Understanding “How to Say It”

Marketers can use this visual to understand the four elements that impact the cultural fluency of their advertising.  Our AdRate creative assessment methodology takes this one step further by applying machine learning to decipher why different groups respond so differently to advertising.  Learn more about Adrate or contact your Client Services representative to commission your own engagement to evaluate the Cultural Fluency of your advertising and to what extent you are exposed to backlash.

Understanding “Where to Say It”

Knowing what to say and how to say it are necessary but not sufficient to connect with the New Wave: marketers must also “show up and connect” in the places that matter to the New Wave – whether in experiential, traditional media, social media, in-store or via various forms of influence.  In 2019, we investigated word-of-mouth  social networks in multicultural segments. 

Webinar Replay

New Year, New Multicultural New Year’s Insights

New Year, New Multicultural New Year’s Insights

The New Year’s holiday offers brands a wide range of opportunities to activate Multicultural Americans. Read the research to deepen understanding of how these diverse consumers celebrate the holiday and how best to activate them. Check out the free, digital version of our research below.

Matthew Heinz
Matthew Heinz

Matthew has been an analyst at Collage Group since 2018. When not at work he spends his time with family and his senior cat Melrose. He lives in Washington DC and enjoys exploring the different neighborhoods around the city.

As we begin this year’s holiday season, it’s important to keep in mind that opportunities to activate consumers continues right through the New Year! New Year’s Eve provides brands an opportunity to be a part of the party, while New Year’s resolutions are a chance to help consumers meet their newly-stated goals in the months to come. To maximize the value of  New Year’s marketing campaigns, check out our New Year’s multicultural insights deck and the three high-level takeaways below.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Don’t Miss the Next Webinar 

Essential Hispanic Insights for 2020

January 15th | 2PM

 

New Year’s is celebrated by most Americans across all ethnic groups, though Hispanics are particularly likely to enjoy the festivities. Americans 65 and over are less likely than younger generations to celebrate.

Although sparkling wine is typically a toasting drink to usher in the new year, other alcoholic beverages play a prominent role in the celebration. Hispanic consumers are most likely to drink beer during their celebrations, while Black consumers are most likely to drink liquor/spirits.

When it comes to New Year’s Resolutions, multicultural Americans are much more likely to set goals for their new year. Those resolutions are more likely to be related to relationships and finances than the resolutions of their White peers.

Celebrating Through the Ages: Generational Insights on Holidays and Occasions

Celebrating Through the Ages: Generational Insights on Holidays and Occasions

You asked and we delivered: insights on holidays and occasions are here! Make the most of seasonal festivities by using this data to better connect with both younger and older consumers.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Don’t Miss the Next Webinar 

How to Navigate the Streaming Revolution in a Diverse America

December 4th | 2PM

Our 2019 Holidays and Occasions research reveals what marketers and insights leaders need to know to connect with consumers around major holidays such as Christmas, Thanksgiving, and Halloween, and special occasions like barbecues and nightlife. We’ve gathered our findings and recommendations from this research into a series of mini-decks that explore how consumer attitudes and behaviors surrounding these events vary across generations. In this bundle of decks, you’ll find insights specific to each celebration along with executional examples of brands activating on consumer festivities.

1.

While major holidays remain important across generations, Gen Z and Millennials over-index on minor holiday celebrations. These niche and culturally-specific holidays are an opportunity to connect with younger consumers who are more diverse and tend to be more inclusive.

2.

Younger consumers are more open-minded towards advertising around niche and culturally-specific holidays. Show Gen Z and Millennials you’re in-tune with what they care about: don’t neglect these holidays and make sure to provide an accurate representation that doesn’t feel “culturally appropriative.”

3.

Gen Z and Millennials are culturally diverse and incorporate their unique backgrounds into traditional holiday celebrations, like eating both ethnic foods and turkey at Thanksgiving. Make sure to capture the “unconventional” yet realistic ways that consumers celebrate holidays to create a personalized connection.

Unleash the Power of Culture with Collage Group to Drive Growth for your Brand.

Multicultural Insights • Generational Insights

Motherhood in the Age of Social Media

Motherhood in the Age of Social Media

While consumers of all ages and backgrounds engage in social media, Millennial and Gen X moms participate in specific social media behaviors that marketers and insights professionals need to understand.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Don’t Miss the Next Webinar 

How to Navigate the Streaming Revolution in a Diverse America

December 4th | 2PM

FOR many moms, social media provides community and social interaction during a hectic and isolating season of life. It’s a place where they can turn to friends and strangers alike for crucial parenting advice, life hacks, and tried-and-true product recommendations as they navigate motherhood. Many even seek out information directly from brands on social media such as product details, promotions, and sales. In fact, Millennial and Gen X moms (those with children aged 14 or younger)


actually use social media at higher rates than their non-mom female counterparts
to obtain product and brand information.

As the graph below shows, about two-thirds of all moms (of children 14 or younger) “like” or “follow” products or brands on social media. This is especially the case for non-Hispanic moms, who are about twice as likely to do so as non-Hispanic non-moms: 66% versus 33% respectively. 

This indicates that moms are leaning on social media as a trusted source for product information beyond traditional media advertising and brands’ e-commerce sites. Brands that lack an accessible and descriptive social media page that showcases their offerings will be behind the curve with the many moms who rely on this source of product information.

More so than non-moms, most moms across segments like sharing their experiences and opinions about products and brands on social media. This is especially true for non-Hispanic moms, who again, are about twice as likely to engage in this way than non-Hispanic non-moms (63% versus 32%). Their difference with Hispanic moms (50%) is also statistically significant. If your brand wants to facilitate dialogue and shared experience on social media, then you should target those most inclined to participate: non-Hispanic moms followed by Hispanics moms.

You may be wondering which non-Hispanic segment(s) is driving the non-Hispanic mom over-index. We are too! So we’re going to be conducting research and digging deeper into the non-Hispanic moms group in 2020.

Both of the above data points align with trends we’re seeing on social media today. A growing number of moms are stepping into influencer roles to capitalize on the community and wealth of product recommendations they’ve accumulated through experience. For example, Claudia Felix-Garay (@thelatinamom), a Hispanic mom influencer with over 80k followers, Naomi Davis (@taza), a non-Hispanic White mom influencer with 463k followers, and Jennifer Borget (@jenniferborget), a Black mom influencer with over 90k followers all run accounts that evolved out of successful blogs. They write about their lives as mothers while also inviting readers to adopt aspects of their lifestyle by sharing what products they use and places they like to go. Brands that are interested in partnering with powerful social media influencers should consider moms!

As you head into the end of the year and prepare for your next social media push, remember to keep these stats (and moms!) in mind.  And keep an eye out for upcoming blogs on moms and our moms study coming out in 2020.

’Tis the Season for Insights into Consumers’ Christmas Attitudes and Behaviors

’Tis the Season for Insights into Consumers’ Christmas Attitudes and Behaviors
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Christmas is a widely celebrated and much-loved holiday across racial and ethnic segments. And the associated spend is massive—more than 1 trillion dollars in 2018! Brands should go big during this festive season to ensure they capture their share of America’s increasingly diverse population.

Don’t Miss the Next Webinar

Win the New Wave of Consumers

November 19th, 2019 | 2PM

Our recent research on holidays identifies the major similarities and differences in how consumers across racial and ethnic segments think about and celebrate Christmas. Brands should use these learnings to ensure their Christmas activations have wide reach and resonate deeply. Get in the holiday spirit with these three takeaways, and make sure to download a sample of the research, below

1. Across segments, most consumers’ Christmas celebrations include family time, food, and gifts. Brands can have mass appeal by activating on these shared elements.

From your personal experience, what do you need to celebrate Christmas properly?

2. Even though common elements appear across segments, culture shapes how consumers celebrate Christmas. For example, many Hispanics’ biggest celebration is with family on Christmas Eve (Nochebuena), not Christmas day. And Hispanics of Mexican descent often enjoy tamales during this gathering. Brands can differentiate themselves by showing consumers how their product(s) naturally support culturally-specific celebrations.

The way I celebrate Christmas is different from a typical “American” Christmas.

3. While Christmas stems from a common religious heritage, the expression of faith can vary widely. For example, Black consumers are more likely to pray, while Hispanics go to church. In order to achieve an authentic portrayal of Christmas, reflect the nuances in faith for each segment.

From your personal experience, what do you need to do to celebrate Christmas properly?

Download the research.

Pass the Plate: Thanksgiving Research

Help Yourself to a Second Serving of Thanksgiving Insights

Our latest research on Holidays and Occasions identifies where segments differ in their Thanksgiving attitudes and behaviors. Commonly associated with family time and eating turkey, this holiday actually has segment-specific nuances that brands must understand in order to win multicultural consumers. 

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Don’t Miss the Next Webinar

Win with Experiences – Adapt to How Diverse America Engages Through Holidays and Occasions

November 13th | 2PM

Here are three key insights from our findings that will help your brand authentically and effectively connect with multicultural consumers on this special day. Scroll down to download a sample of the research.

1.

African Americans’ have bigger Thanksgiving celebrations and incorporate more non-food elements. Use activities like watching football and watching a parade as opportunities to connect with the segment. Reflect the wide array of activities in your content to show you understand them.

What do you need to do to celebrate Thanksgiving properly?

2. 

Both Hispanic and African Americans are more likely to involve non-family members in their Thanksgiving celebrations. Highlight the friendship and community component of Thanksgiving when activating with these segments.

Who do you celebrate Thanksgiving with?

3. 

Both Hispanic and African Americans see Thanksgiving as a time for reflection. Do not be flip in your activations—your message should clearly connect with the holiday’s spirit of gratitude and the many ways people recognize this.

What do you need to celebrate Thanksgiving properly?

Download a Sample of the Research.